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Customs seizes P18.5M worth of misdeclared shipments in Davao City port

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The Bureau of Customs (BOC) has confiscated a total of P18.5-million worth of misdeclared used clothing and dump truck from China in Davao City port.

BOC Commissioner Isidro Lapeña said the 10 shipments of misdeclared used clothes or ukay-ukay worth P17.8 million and used dump truck amounting to P700,000 were seized on July 19 at Sasa Wharf and Davao International Container Terminal.

The 10 shipments containing misdeclared used clothes or ukay-ukay were consigned to Zainar General Merchandising, Al-Shaeer Enterprises, Suluans General Merchandising, and Mourpling Trading, while the misdeclared dump truck was under the name of Fullwon Philippines Ent. Ltd. Inc.

The consignee for the 10 shipments declared in the import documents that they were bedsheets, thin blankets, shoes, bags, and stuffed toys.

But authorities found that they contain bales of used clothes.

The importation of used clothes is prohibited under Republic Act No. 4653 or “An Act to Safeguard the Health of the People and maintain the Dignity of the Nation by declaring it a National Policy to Prohibit the Commercial Importation of Textile articles commonly known as Used Clothing and Rags.”

The consignee also allegedly violated the provisions of the Customs Modernization and Tariff Act (CMTA).

On the other hand, Fullwon declared its shipment as crushing machine, conveyor belt, electric generator, steel ball, wire, screening machine, and mine tractor, BOC said.

However, when it was inspected, apart from the declared goods, authorities discovered one unit used completely build up dump truck. The used dump truck was misdeclared as mine tractor.

“The consignee violated Executive Order 877-A, series of 2010 or “The Comprehensive Motor Development Program”, and Section 1113 (Property Subject to Seizure and Forfeiture) of the CMTA,” said District Collector lawyer Romalino Valdez, who issued the warrant of seizure and detention of the used dump truck.

Lapeña appealed to the public to not patronize used clothing or ukay-ukay for it poses health risks.